Welcome to our outline guide

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Population Trends

1.1 How many migrants are living in each local authority?

As you scroll through this section you will find two charts. Figure 1 deals with the share of migrants in local areas across Great Britain. Figure 2 shows the size of the EU- and non-EU born populations in those areas. Hover over the charts to see more data. Type into the search box to look up information about a specific location.

The most up-to-date source of information on the number of migrants residing in local authorities is usually the Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) Population of the UK by Country of Birth and Nationality dataset for England and Wales; similar data for local authorities in Scotland are available through National Records Scotland (NRS). These data provide local-level estimates by both country of birth and nationality, and break the migrant population down by region of origin (e.g. EU-14, EU-8, etc.). The available estimates for Northern Ireland cover the whole of Northern Ireland rather than local authorities. They are included in the ONS dataset and accessible from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). The ONS Local Area Migration Indicators suite and the Scottish Local Area Migration data bring together the available local-level estimates by country of birth and nationality for all parts of the UK.

Figure 1 shows how the foreign-born share of the population varied across local authorities in the UK in 2018 by presenting: (1) overall estimates of the foreign-born population across local authorities; and (2) estimates of the share of foreign-born in the LA population.

Download the source data in this chart for England from ONS

The data can also be accessed in map format on the ONS website

Download the source data in this chart for Scotland from NRS

Figure 1: Percent of the population who are foreign born, by local authority in Great Britain (2018)

Data Notes ?

Estimates are not available for some localities or have been supressed due to confidentiality requirements. Values of zero include values measured as and rounded to zero. Foreign-born population data by local government district are not available for Northern Ireland.

Downloads

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Last updated: 2019-09-03
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Figure 2 shows the ONS estimates for the EU and non-EU born populations since 2004. Changes in the foreign-born population in specific local authorities from one year to the next should be treated with caution, however, because local-level estimates often come with substantial margins of error. It is therefore better to look at long-term trends rather than year-on-year changes.

The main ONS dataset providing these data also contains the same local-area information by nationality rather than country of birth (ONS table 2.1). It is important to note when using nationality data that some groups of migrants are more likely to become UK citizens than others (specifically, non-EU citizens are more likely to naturalise than EU citizens) and will therefore not be counted. There are also estimates for the working age (16 to 64 year old) population (ONS tables 1.2 and 2.2).

ONS also provides a dataset broken down by individual nationalities and countries of birth, although in most cases the numbers for individual countries of origin are either too small to estimate or come with large margins of error relative to the estimate itself.

Download the source data in this chart for England and Wales from ONS

Download the source data in this chart for Scotland from NRS

Figure 2: Non-UK born population by local authority in England and Wales (2004-2018)

Data Notes ?

Some local authorities have no data or zero values because the migrant sample size in the APS survey is too small. Foreign-born population data by local government district are not available for Northern Ireland.

Downloads

.csv .xls .image
Last updated: 2019-09-17
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